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Of the 16 players who had per-game roster bonuses for the Green Bay Packers this past season, only two of them — tight end Lance Kendricks and kicker Mason Crosby — collected the full amount.

The other 14 combined to miss a total of 57 games, therefore losing more than $2 million in bonus money this season.

The biggest loser was right tackle Bryan Bulaga, who missed out on $412,500 in weekly roster bonuses. His contract calls for a bonus of $37,500 for each game he’s on the 46-man active roster. Bulaga tore his ACL and played in only five games, thus collecting just $187,500 of a potential $600,000.

Quarterback Aaron Rodgers missed out on $337,500 because he missed nine games because of his broken collarbone. The Packers saved the same amount with tight end Martellus Bennett, who appeared in only seven games for the Packers, although he did collect two more weeks of $37,500 bonuses from the Patriots, who got two games out of him after they claimed him off waivers.

Kendricks earned all $300,000 of his weekly roster bonus money because he was active all 16 regular-season games, and Crosby earned all $150,000 of his.

In all, the Packers paid out $5,981,250 of a possible $8 million in weekly roster bonuses — or 74.8 percent of the possible 2017 total. The unpaid $2,018,750 will be credited to the team’s 2018 salary cap.

In 2016, the Packers paid out 83.4 percent of their possible weekly roster-bonus money — another indication they were more injured this season, when they went 7-9 and missed the playoffs for the first time since 2008.

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You don’t have to agree with it — and you probably won’t — but Mike McCarthy dove deeper into his explanation for the 57-yard field goal attempt in the third quarter of Sunday night’s loss at Pittsburgh.

The Green Bay Packers’ coach called the right decision at the time and hindsight did nothing to change his viewpoint.

“I don’t really understand the criticism of it,” McCarthy said a day later.

McCarthy was aware of the fact that Chris Boswell’s game-winning 53-yard field goal tied for the longest kick ever made at Heinz Field, but the Packers have their own formula for determining the kick-or-punt line.

“Our process is the same each and every game,” McCarthy said. “We have a structured pregame routine. There’s information that’s gathered. We have a challenge here in our own stadium.

“If I’m guilty of anything, I’ve got great confidence in Mason Crosby. But no, I don’t second-guess. We had a chance to go up two scores.”

The Packers had a 21-14 lead at the time when they took over at the Steelers’ 45-yard line following Blake Martinez’s interception. After three runs by Jamaal Williams put the Packers into field goal range at the 31-yard line, Brett Hundley was sacked on first down, threw incomplete on second down and was sacked again on third down, pushing the ball back to the 39-yard line, where McCarthy sent in the field goal unit.

“The first-, second- and third-down things leading up to the field goal I’m more upset about than anything,” McCarthy said. “What went on in those, particularly the two [sack] plays, that’s where my focus is because that’s correctable. But if I was in that spot again, based on all the information going into that decision, it’s the right call. We’re playing against — we’re on the road, we’re playing against — I mean, the big three of that offense [Ben Roethlisberger, Antonio Brown and Le’Veon Bell]. Let’s be honest, that’s as good a trio of players as we’ve played against all year. We need the points.”

When asked whether the 57-yarder was within the range Crosby was comfortable with in pregame warmups, special-teams coordinator Ron Zook said: “Right about there.”

“One thing about Mason now [he would say], ‘Put the ball down and let’s kick it,’” Zook added. “If you talk to Mason, he’s got to hit that. You get into a game, where we are in the season, I think if Mason had to do it over again, he’d hit it. The snap was a little high, but, still, Justin [Vogel] got it down there. Shoot, you’ve got to have points and he’s got to hit it.”

Crosby missed badly to the left, giving the Steelers the ball at their own 47-yard line. Had the Packers punted, they had the chance to pin the Steelers deep in their own territory. With favorable field position, the Steelers needed only six plays to go the 53 yards to tie the game on the first of two touchdown catches by Brown.

“I’m trying to gain momentum,” McCarthy said. “I don’t think you can think like that, you know? … You have to decide how you’re going to play the game, and the reality of it is that gets you started. But there’s things that go on during the course of the game, there’s constant communication going on there based on where we were playing, how we were playing and what was going on in all three phases. You have to go for the points there if you have the faith in your kicker based on the kicks he hit in pregame and everything leading up to that. Really, if we were at fault, it was the two negative plays on first and third down.”

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There’s quarterback Aaron Rodgers plus receiver Jordy Nelson and right tackle Bryan Bulaga on offense. There’s safety Morgan Burnett and linebacker Clay Matthews on defense, plus kicker Mason Crosby.

Look around the Green Bay Packers’ locker room, and those are the only six players who remain from the franchise’s last Super Bowl team.

All of them no doubt yearn for a second Super Bowl, but two of them have to know their time is running shorter than the others. It isn’t Crosby or Rodgers, even though they’re the oldest among those players, at age 33. Kickers and quarterbacks can play until 40 — or beyond.

It isn’t Bulaga or Burnett; they’re both only 28.

It’s Matthews, 31, and Nelson, 32.

Both have contracts that expire after next season, and both play positions predicated on speed and athleticism, two things that can decline quickly. Both no doubt took it hard when Rodgers went on injured reserve last month because of his broken collarbone, knowing deep down that another year might pass without a return trip to the big game, even if the competitors in them won’t admit it.

“Is it going to be tough sledding this year?” Matthews said in an interview this past week. “Absolutely, but hopefully we can weather the storm until Aaron gets back. I don’t know. You just hope you get hot at the right time, and we’ve done that before.”

“I don’t know if it’s dwindling,” Matthews said of his chance to get another Super Bowl title. “But if you have the nucleus we have — championship teams usually have a great defense and a star quarterback. We’ve got the star quarterback, and we’ve shown flashes on defense. We’re a couple of plays away. … We ran into Atlanta last year in the NFC title game, and that was a buzz saw. I don’t know if we’re losing opportunities. Those opportunities are there. It’s just a matter of capitalizing. Unfortunately, we haven’t.”

Here’s a look at how Nelson and Matthews view their chances to get back to the Super Bowl:

Clay Matthews

Matthews was 24 years old and in his second NFL season when the Packers won Super Bowl XLV. A year earlier, he was a first-round pick and became the first Packers player since 1978 to make the Pro Bowl as a rookie. In the Super Bowl season of 2010, he was the runner-up to Pittsburgh’s Troy Polamalu for the NFL’s Defensive Player of the Year award.

The son of Clay Matthews Jr. and the nephew of Bruce Matthews, each of whom played 19 seasons in the NFL, Matthews surely figured that was just the beginning.

“Well, I think you’re a little naïve in thinking that, but especially following up the next year going 15-1, you’re like, ‘We’ve got something cooking here,’” said Matthews, who made one of the defining plays of Super Bowl XLV when he forced a fumble of Steelers running back Rashard Mendenhall in the fourth quarter.

“We win that whole thing, and you’re going, ‘That’s pretty cool.’ Then ’11 comes along, and you’re 15-1, and you’re thinking, ‘We’re going to do this again,’ but you lose [in the playoffs] and you’re like, ‘OK, let’s refocus,’” Matthews said.

“In 2012, we got a second shot at San Francisco after playing them in Week 1, but we ran into a little bit of a buzz saw with Colin Kaepernick. Then, in 2013, Aaron gets hurt with the first [broken] collarbone, but we still get in [the playoffs] and lost at home, but I had just re-broken my thumb [and did not play]. In 2014, you’re right there again in Seattle [losing the NFC title game in overtime], those type of losses, and so on and so on.”

Matthews is in the fourth season of a five-year, $66 million contract extension. The Packers’ career sack leader — a mark he set earlier this year — hasn’t had a double-digit sack season since 2014. He has battled injuries but said before this season that if he can stay healthy for 16 games, he knows he can be as productive as ever. He has played 82 percent of the defensive snaps so far this season but has only 2.5 sacks.

“I’ll say this — and Clay may get mad that I say this about him — but Clay Matthews appreciates and participates with so much more energy in the practice environment,” Packers coach Mike McCarthy said in an interview this past week. “I see that over and over in this league that older players practice so much more and harder and are more giving of themselves to young players. The way Clay goes about his business today is night and day different than it was six years ago.”

Next season, Matthews would make $11.4 million if he’s on the roster. He is looking beyond that.

“Check the genealogy,” he said, offering a reminder of how long his dad and uncle played. “I don’t know how long I’m going to play. But I feel like I’m very real with myself from where I felt like I was going to be drafted to what I feel like I can accomplish, and I still feel really good. I feel like I can contribute a lot. I don’t think I’ve fallen off or lost a step. I’d love to be here for many more years. You accomplish what you can, and we’ll see where we’re at after next year.”

Jordy Nelson

Nelson was 25 and in his third NFL season when the Packers won the Super Bowl. It wasn’t until the next season that he became a 1,000-yard receiver and Rodgers’ No. 1 target.

Now, Nelson has three more reasons to get back to a Super Bowl: his kids. His son Royal was a year old the first time. Since then, Nelson and his wife, Emily, have adopted another son, Brooks, 2, and an infant daughter, Adda.

“Once you taste it, you want it again,” Nelson said in an interview this past week. “You want to experience it. Things have changed in my life that I want my kids to experience. My oldest turned a year the week of the Super Bowl. There’s pictures and stuff, but he doesn’t know what was going on. Now he’d be able to enjoy it.”

Nelson recalled the moments immediately after the 31-25 victory being a blur.

“I remember being on the field, and I was getting ushered off to go do the media, but I was like, ‘I need to stay here for a second,’” he said. “So I stopped and stood there with my wife and my son and took it all in. I have absolutely no idea what went on in the locker room after the game because I had to go to the media room. An hour later, I finally got in the locker room, and everyone was gone.

“I think you’d appreciate it more [the second time].”

Nelson has one more season left on his contract — he’s due to make $10.25 million — but the Packers are going to have to pay top money to another receiver, Davante Adams, who is scheduled to be a free agent after this season. Either way, Nelson wants to keep playing.

“I plan on playing two to four more years, so I think I’ve got two to four more chances,” he said. “I mean, that’s how we feel. Even if you look back to a few years ago, when Aaron broke his collarbone, once he came back and got into the playoffs, we felt like we had a chance. It’s the same thing now. You’ve just got to get in. You never know what could happen.”

From McCarthy’s vantage point, Nelson is doing more than ever to try to make it happen.

“Jordy speaks up in meetings all the time now,” McCarthy said. “Jordy speaks up on the sideline during the games — I’ve got to keep him off the officials sometimes — but he would’ve never done that eight years ago.”

That’s why Nelson uses the word “when,” rather than “if,” when he talks about the Packers getting back to the Super Bowl.

“I don’t want to say it will be sweeter because I think it downplays the one you got,” Nelson said. “But knowing where you’re at in your career, there’s certain things you would do to enjoy it. If it’s the week of the Super Bowl, with the family would be more enjoyable for me because all the kids would be there postgame and enjoying that.

“And honestly, all the perks that come with winning the Super Bowl, if it’s the TV shows or different things — we had kind of an awkward one because we had the lockout, and we didn’t really see each other until August. It will all be different.”

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With their top three offensive tackles on the injury list — and two others already on injured reserve — the Packers will sign Ulrick John off the Arizona Cardinals’ practice squad, his agent told ESPN.

The move is a sign the Packers have serious concerns about the availability of Bryan Bulaga (ankle), David Bakhtiari (hamstring) and Kyle Murphy (foot).

All three were on Monday’s injury report, leaving their status for Thursday night’s game against the Chicago Bears at Lambeau Field up in the air.

“It’s a tough situation for them,” said John’s agent, Leonard Roth. “They might even have him active for the game.”

Bulaga, who missed the first two weeks, could not finish Sunday’s game against the Cincinnati Bengals. He dropped out after 47 of the 70 snaps and was replaced by Justin McCray, who started the Week 2 game at Atlanta. Bakhtiari was inactive for the second straight week. Murphy, who started Week 1 in place of Bulaga and the past two games at left tackle, showed up on the injury report Monday even though he finished Sunday’s game.

The Packers did not practice on Monday but were required to submit an estimated participation level because they’re playing on Thursday. Of the three tackles, only Bakhtiari would have practiced, and it would have been on a limited basis. Two other tackles, Jason Spriggs (hamstring) and Don Barclay (ankle), are on injured reserve.

“When you have one position that gets hit by it, maybe it has something to do with playing Chicago on Thursday night,” Packers coach Mike McCarthy said. “Last year it was the running backs. This year it’s the tackles. So, you just work through it. Frankly, we’re still working through it. … There’s still some testing that’s being done. But yeah, it’s a work in progress.”

John started three games for the Cardinals last season at right tackle. He appeared in two games in 2015 for Miami but has no ties to the Packers or their offensive system.

The Packers will have to clear a roster spot on Tuesday for John. They made one move on Monday, when they placed veteran long-snapper Brett Goode on injured reserve and signed Taybor Pepper, who was with the team during the offseason program.

Goode finished Sunday’s game against the Bengals, snapping a perfect ball on Mason Crosby’s 27-yard game-winning field goal in overtime despite suffering a hamstring injury earlier in the game. A source said Goode could return in four weeks, but the Packers had so many injuries that they couldn’t afford to keep him on the roster. Green Bay was preparing tight end Richard Rodgers to snap on Sunday if Goode couldn’t go.

“I can’t say enough about him pushing through,” McCarthy said. “This is part of being on a short week and this is one thing we were hoping wasn’t going to be as bad as we thought it was going to be after the game, but after the examination today this was the direction we had to go.”